The Truth

Lots of people claim to tell the truth, but who says, “I am the truth?”

That Jesus’ closest disciples took this statement in stride without leaving the room, or without even a word of protest, speaks volumes about Him.  They knew they were dealing with someone extraordinary.   They were yet to find out just how extraordinary.  (For more, see Jesus Christ Is God.)

Call on His Name:  The Truth.

Bible notes on this post.

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ to those who want to hear about Him without having to join a church – or anything else – but Him.

4 Replies to “The Truth”

  1. “but who says, “I am the truth?”

    Ummm, the anonymous author of John, who never claimed to have ever laid eyes on Jesus. Nor did he claim to have personally known anyone who had, themselves, ever laid eyes on Jesus. And John is written in Greek, which Jesus and his followers likely didn’t even speak.

    And if this “truth” statement is so important, isn’t is kind of odd that none of the other Gospels seem to mention it?
    I’m sure it just slipped their minds, huh Mike?

    “It has always seemed to me that a being coming from another world, with a message of infinite importance to mankind, should at least have verified that message by his own signature. Is it not wonderful that not one word was written by Christ?”-Robert Ingersoll

  2. “but who says, “I am the truth?”

    Ummm, the anonymous author of John, who never claimed to have ever laid eyes on Jesus.  Nor did he claim to have personally known anyone who had, themselves, ever laid eyes on Jesus.

    He’s not anonymous.  His name has been associated with the book since antiquity.  Yes, some scholars question whether this was indeed John the son of Zebedee (brother of James, associate of Peter, and one of the twelve), but I don’t have any problem believing that it was.  Consider John 21:15-23 which makes perfect sense in that view.  Regarding his claim to have been an eyewitness,  it’s found in final words of the book (John 21:24-25).

    And John is written in Greek, which Jesus and his followers likely didn’t even speak.

    After Jesus’ resurrection and ascension, the apostles were charged with taking His message to the world.  Greek was the lingua franca of the Roman Empire in that age.  Jews of that day were dispersed throughout the world and had adopted Greek for practical reasons.  In fact, it’s obvious that whenever the apostles quoted the Old Testament in their writings, they primarily did so from the Greek translation of the Hebrew Scriptures (the Septuagint, LXX).  To assume that John wouldn’t have known anyone who could teach him Greek, or that John couldn’t have dictated his message to a scribe who knew Greek, seems a real stretch.

    And if this “truth” statement is so important, isn’t is kind of odd that none of the other Gospels seem to mention it?
    I’m sure it just slipped their minds, huh Mike?

    It doesn’t seem odd to me at all that we don’t find this quote in the other gospels.  John himself said that Jesus did so many things that “if they were written in detail, I suppose that even the world itself would not contain the books that were written” (John 21:25).  He was a busy Savior.  Given the fact that the apostles fulfilled their mission primarily by preaching and not by writing, and that they all seem to have died as martyrs, it surprises me that we have as many writings from them as we do.

    “It has always seemed to me that a being coming from another world, with a message of infinite importance to mankind, should at least have verified that message by his own signature. Is it not wonderful that not one word was written by Christ?”-Robert Ingersoll

    This is one of the distinguishing characteristics of Jesus which gives us reason to recognize that He is truly unique among spiritual leaders.  Most spiritual leaders write their own books (Muhammad, Joseph Smith, L. Ron Hubbard).  Jesus never committed a word of ink to the page, much less signed it.  Moreover, documentation for Jesus and His teaching was produced hundreds of years before He was born (in what we call the Old Testament).  All other spiritual leaders write their teachings and autobiographies  during their lives or afterward.  Ingersoll is right that Jesus is noteworthy for not having written of Himself – but draws the wrong conclusion from this wondrous fact.  Jesus never sought fame or fortune, He was constantly doing good to others, and He died hated and penniless.  Would Ingersoll have been happier if Jesus had been as self-aggrandizing as Muhammad, Smith, and Hubbard – or even Ingersoll himself?

    Everyone is going to heaven – for this, Jesus is responsible.  How could have He been more selfless?

  3. First I was immediately intrigued by Him showing me some lessons of truth about real life…

    And it still fascinates me that most often the things are not what they seem to be. I have also learned that coming to know the truth about people means: “Never judge a new book by its cover and turn away without a second look!”
    God, in fact, “shows no partiality” (Rom 2:11) and He will always show you ‘what only someone with the light of faith in the heart sees’. The truth that can be seen in the Light, i.e. in Christ, is always there like the sun that shines upon you all around and everywhere…

    Although I do admit that my eyes often need some time to get used to the brightness of God’s Light 😉 It usually takes time between the take-off in the sunshine and the landing of my blanked mind when the sun just begins to set like a wandering jet 🙂

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